Grieving Gold Star mom shuts down CNN’s Trump hammering: ‘I just want people to remember my son’

BPR: In a never ending quest to criticize President Donald Trump, CNN brought on the parents of another Gold Star family whose son was killed in action. And it made for a heart-wrenching interview.

Sheila and Calvin Murphy appeared on the network to discuss their son, Etienne Murphy, 22, who died in Syria.

 

Host Alisyn Camerota attempted to bait Sheila Murphy by asking if she had received a call from president Trump, but Murphy shut the door quick.

“No I haven’t but it’s OK,” she said. “It doesn’t matter if I hear from the White House or not, because it’s not really … about a call or letter.”

She said that all she wants is for people to remember her son and added that no Gold Star family is concerned about a call from the president.

“The worst thing I have ever been called is a Gold Star mom,” she said as she wept.

Camerota would not let it go.

“I know that you, you wrote a letter to the White House, I think,” she said. “What did you want the president to know about your son?”

“I just wanted him to not forget my son,” she said. “And I actually thank President Trump for ordering the air strike in Syria but it wasn’t enough to save my child. I have no hard feelings towards anyone.”

Sheila Murphy cried for the entire, tough to watch, interview.

Camerota asked the grieving mother “how can we help you?” And Murphy put all of the controversy and politicking in perspective with one sentence.

“If you could just give me my son back,” she said.

Watch

16 Comments on Grieving Gold Star mom shuts down CNN’s Trump hammering: ‘I just want people to remember my son’

  1. Alison, can y’all stop stalking people and just concentrate on your sad attempt to make Niger Trump’s Benghazi? It will fail, as your Puerto Rico Katrina failed, but at least grieving families will be left alone.

  2. CNN: The Clownfart News Network where the “news” always smells “funny”!
    These are very wicked people, who would attempt to take advantage of an emotionally vulnerable woman who has lost her husband, simply to score political points with their small, sick, twisted base of perverted haters!
    This is full-on Propaganda (read sedition) that I honestly can imagine Tokyo Rose doing in a very similar fashion!!!
    This shit needs to STOP!

  3. I. Just. Can’t.
    This mother, while heartbreaking to watch, articulated so beautifully her love for her son, the unfiltered grief her family suffers through daily in their alone time when no one is watching, her desire to memorialize him as the hero he was, and the fear he’ll be forgotten. May God protect the family and carrying them to eventual peaceful acceptance.

    As for Alisyn’s pathetic faux sympathy and understanding, I’d love to punch her in the f**king face.

  4. It would be so easy to put hollywood and these networks in their place, if only people canceled their cable/sattv and put up an antenna. I did it years ago. I refuse to pay to be insulted, you should too. I will not do business with people that I know despise me.
    Follow the money, you’ll see what I mean.
    It is a small but very effective sacrifice for the good of humanity.

  5. These ‘news’ vultures just cannot leave these bereaved families alone. I’ve helped bury a mothers son that died in a helicopter. Was in charge of the firing squad for that funeral.

    The family insisted the entire funeral detail come home with them after the interment. The Lt. in charge said we would. I had old women holding my hand in that back yard telling me stories about ‘that boy’ we just buried.

    Whom I did not know. We buried six in the thirty day rotation we served as active duty funeral detail for central Texas. Five were vets and long out of service. This one was a young Warrant Officer helicopter co-pilot.

    The family was black. We were green. We were loved on by that family for the way we attended his funeral and burial. Because for us, he was us.

    If you observe a military funeral conducted by active duty military burying an active duty member, look close. You’ll see the pain in their conduct, their attention to their appearance, their precision in rendering final honors to their brother.

    I’m very proud of the men I worked with on that detail.

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