Forbidden love: Valentine’s Day banned for some in Asia

JAKARTA/ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Valentine’s Day celebrations on Tuesday were banned by authorities in parts of Indonesia and Pakistan, home to Asia’s largest Muslim populations, saying the romantic tradition encouraged casual sex and ran counter to cultural norms.

In Indonesia, officials from the country’s second largest city, Surabaya, ordered schools to prohibit students from celebrating Valentine’s Day, while in Makassar, police raided minimarts and seized condoms in a bid to prevent teenagers from having sex.

“These raids were done after we received reports from residents that the minimarts were selling condoms in an unregulated way, especially on Valentine’s Day,” Makassar police official Jufri was quoted as saying in a media report.

Indonesia’s highest Islamic clerical council declared Valentine’s Day forbidden by Islamic law in 2012, saying it was contradictory to Muslim culture and teachings.

But the vast majority of Indonesia’s more than 220 million Muslims follow a moderate form of Islam in a country with sizeable Christian and Hindu minorities. Indonesia is a secular country whose state ideology enshrines religious diversity.

In Indonesia’s capital, Jakarta, and other parts of the country, Valentine’s Day has grown in popularity with companies, like national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia, looking to cash in by offering special discounts and promotions.

In Pakistan, an Islamic republic, a court banned public Valentine’s Day celebrations in its capital.  more

7 Comments on Forbidden love: Valentine’s Day banned for some in Asia

  1. Saint Valentine was beheaded for performing Christian marriages. I thought all the statesmanlike Muslims would be “down wit dat”.

  2. I am not surprise that Pakistan and Surabaya banned the Valentine stuff

    However, the Makassar stuff is a surprise. Thinking some “religious police” were shipped in. This is bound to get weird.

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