The Original Social Justice Warrior: Father Charles Coughlin

American Thinker: The most notorious American anti-Semite of the 1930s was Father Charles Coughlin, the charismatic pastor of Shrine of the Little Flower in suburban Detroit.  In 1934, Father Coughlin founded the National Union for Social Justice, which published a weekly newspaper, “Social Justice.”  Two hundred thousand people read the paper, and as many as 30 million tuned in to his Sunday broadcasts.  Tens of thousands joined the Social Justice Councils that were established nationwide.

Social Justice reprinted excerpts from The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, discredited in the Anglo-American world for fifteen years.  Ten days after Kristallnacht, Coughlin blamed the Jews for the pogrom, citing statistics provided by Nazi publications.  Gentiles had finally wised up to the people who ran both Wall Street and the Kremlin.  The alliance between the “banksters” (Coughlin coined the term) and the Bolshies may have seemed unlikely, but it only demonstrated how devious and relentless the Jews were in their efforts to destroy Christianity and the West.

The Mirage of Social Justice was the title of what should have been the definitive book on the subject, published more than forty years ago by Nobel laureate Friedrich Hayek (Vol. 2 of Law, Legislation, and Liberty).  The mirage everyone’s familiar with is the strip of water shimmering on the road ahead during a summer day that vanishes as you approach.  So, too, Hayek, as he attempted to analyze the concept, found that it “was entirely empty and meaningless.”  Unfortunately, “to demonstrate that a universally used expression which to many people embodies a quasi-religious belief has no content whatever and serves merely to insinuate that we ought to consent to a demand of a particular group, is much more difficult than to show that a conception is wrong.”  (Hayek had originally set out to demonstrate that redistribution according to someone’s conception of justice would be counterproductive.)

At the heart of the problem is a primitive anthropomorphism, applying to “society” moral precepts evolved to guide the behavior of individuals.  In one of the earliest uses of the term, John Stuart Mill declared, “Society should treat all equally well who have deserved equally well of it.”  But “society” cannot “do” anything.  That power has to come from agents of the government – ultimately, from men carrying guns and subpoenas.  “Society” in modern Europe and North America includes a vast network of voluntary associations and individual transactions that have provided a far greater satisfaction of human desires than any deliberate organization could ever achieve.   read more

10 Comments on The Original Social Justice Warrior: Father Charles Coughlin

  1. Henry Ford fell for this snake oil peddlers crap. Only our deeper involvement into WW2 pulled him somewhat away from him.

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  2. Was he a sodomite?

    “Father,” bah. That’s one of many false traditions you Catholics need to dump, it has led to much abuse. Paul figuratively fathered believers into the family of God through his preaching the saving Gospel, but he was never called nor asked to be called their father as an official title. Nor for calling nuns “mother.” Same with “reverend,” “holiness,” etc.

    Being called brother and sister among fellow believers? Yes, if they’ve believed the same salvation message; otherwise they can’t be related in God at all and someone is lost.

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  3. The Social Justice movement has its roots in Lucifer’s rebellion from God and his farther triffling with humanity when he said “Did God really say…?”

    Charles Darwin further compounded the issue with his poppycock theories of macro evolution.

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  4. History is the ultimate teacher when allowed to be disseminated honestly. Father Coughlin would be someone that younger generations could learn a cautionary lesson from if taught. The left has a tight grip on the educational system and therefore this wouldn’t get passed the censors.

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  5. If we’ve really arrived at the point where networks are brazen enough to discuss ON PUBLIC AIRWAVES whether to selectively censor or even refuse to carry a POTUS address, open civil war is only a matter of time. I advocate nothing except to point out that if lawlessness has taken that firm of a hold, no nation long survives institutional injustice and the selective, inequal application of law. At least not with an armed, tax-burdened populace that’s increasingly made the enemy and the clown for everyone else’s derision. Something big HAS to break and they keep pushing for it to break.

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  6. Think of what would make the Democrats call for an armed invasion of this country – push back and the need for containment camps for the “alt-righters” who have finally had enough because they were stimulated (collusion?) by another foreign entity to rebel (say Russia?).

    We all could be in detention camps next year (or at least my cold dead body will).

    Their frothing at the mouth is not so far off.

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  7. If you really want to understand what Father Coughlin was all about read The Glory And The Dream: America 1932-1972 by William Manchester. It’s one of the best American history books that explains America from the 30’s to the 70’s. And it explains a lot of what Father Coughlin was really all about, he was an anti Semite as well as a populist rabble rouser and a no good Svengali in sheep’s clothing (and clerical garb) who mesmerized a large section of the population into believing his bizarre world view, supposedly 30 million or so people listened to his radio broadcasts back then. Reading this book was the first time I’d ever heard of him and him and all his so called social justice, I ‘ve read it at least 2-3 times, the first was back in the 70’s when it was first published and a couple of times since then to refresh my memory. You have to remember that this was the time of Huey Long as well and others who preached a lot of this populist diatribe including FDR with his New Deal.

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  8. GEOFF

    I have never killed a human in America. but I have distant kin that killed the – – – in your last sentence decades ago. And I agree with their deed. Huey feed a lot of good folk to the gaiters!

    again – I have never kiilled a man in America!

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