Napoleon’s Bloodless Coup

In 1799, Napoleon Bonaparte pulled off one of the greatest political coups in history, seizing control of the French government in a matter of days – without sacrificing a single life.

6 Comments on Napoleon’s Bloodless Coup

  1. Although this might have been a bloodless coup, it was followed by plenty of bloodshed during the years that followed. Napoleon Bonaparte certainly knew how to take advantage of almost any situation. He probably wouldn’t have been defeated at Waterloo if it hadn’t been for the heavy rainfall that turned the battlefield into a muddy quagmire, which prevented him from defeating the British before the Prussians arrived to save the day.

    6
  2. ^^^ …;for the heavy rainfall that turned the battlefield into a muddy quagmire..”
    OT
    useless trivia-
    he thought that Wellington, and his artillery, would be just as quagmired as he was. Not so- they dragged the artillery through the mud, and the rest is history. Or, that the way I was taught.
    “The Artillery Loop (also known as the harness loop or man-harness knot) is a knot used to create a stationary loop in a piece of rope. It was so named because of its use in the military. The running ends, A and B, would be tied to the ends of a barrel or field gun, and the loop, L, would be used as a grip or handhold so that the soldier could move the weapon. The loop could also be lengthened to create a shoulder harness. After prolonged firing, gun barrels get extremely hot, so these makeshift handles were a great help when weapons had to be quickly transported during battle.”
    https://www.netknots.com/rope_knots/artillerymans-loop-knot
    sometimes the little things get overlooked

    1
  3. If German soldiers hadn’t held Le Haye Sainte and British soldiers Hougoumont from French assaults during nine hours of fierce fighting, it’s possible that Napoleon wouldn’t have met his Waterloo. All involved were really brave men. Hard to believe such people existed.

    2

Comments are closed.